Hello Birdy

So there’s a cheerful little bird that has taken to sitting just outside our bedroom window and greeting the morning with a cheerful little song that sounds (to my bleary ears) like ‘Wakey! Wakey wakey! Wakey wakey!’. I’m not sure if it’s just full of the joys of spring or if it’s trying to tell us that the feeders are empty and need filling again. There are, obviously, worse sounds to wake up to* but I do urgently need to find out how to reset the damn thing so it goes off at a reasonable hour…

*when we lived in Maidenhead in the town centre the street cleaning machine used to get sent round seven days a week in the early hours and I can tell you that at five am on a Sunday it sounded like the slow approach of the opening of the crack of doom, especially when you added in the effect of the orange flashing light on its roof. Only the lack of a heavy goods vehicle licence and the home address of the leader of council prevented me from renting one and driving it past his house in the early hours to see how HE liked it,** but I digress.

** in the end I think I settled for a stroppy letter.

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12 Responses to Hello Birdy

  1. Kirsten says:

    Here I sit drinking my morning cocoa and howling with laughter at the thought of you driving the harbinger of doom past the council leader’s house at 5 AM. Priceless!

  2. WOL says:

    Actually, he’s probably saying, “B*gger off, you lot, this is my tree, and I’m the biggest, baddest, most sexy bird on the planet. Check me out, girls.” All that waxing poetic about birdsong — ! If all those poetical types could understand the language of birds, they’d be aghast at the “language.”

    This is probably the bird you have: http://www.bartleby.com/188/135.html

  3. sebbie says:

    We learned just how much a child of a technological age our daughter was when aged two or three and at ‘too early in the morning’ she requested that we turn the birds off please. Maybe you could look for the switch. We never found it.

  4. disgruntled says:

    kirsten – I tell you, there was a while when I was *this* close to doing it
    WOL – you’re probably right. Although as anyone who’s read the Hitch-hiker’s guide to the galaxy series knows, birds mostly talk about aerodynamics and wing-to-weight loading ratios
    Sebbie – I’ll keep you posted

  5. Flighty says:

    Thanks to nearby street lights the birds hereabouts sing during the night, and I often wake around 3.00am and hear them! xx

  6. disgruntled says:

    Probably blackbirds which do sing all night under streetlights – I’ve often wondered if that was what the Beatles were referring to

  7. WOL says:

    About time for the mockingbirds to kick in. The young males in their first breeding season typically sing all night long. Since they are mockingbirds, they don’t have their own song. They sing everybody else’s including car alarms, squeeky doors, model car sounds, etc., all, cotton-picking night long. Which is why I run a fan in my bedroom for the white noise.

  8. disgruntled says:

    oh no I can’t stand to sleep in a room with a fan going. Horses for courses…

  9. WOL says:

    I used to work night shift and had to sleep in the day. What with the traffic noise, etc., having a fan on to mask the noise was the only way I could get any sleep. Now I’m habituated.

  10. […] wind) – this morning brought us the first tentatives rehearsals of our friend the wakey wakey bird. One day, remembering that I am supposed to be some sort of a bird watcher, I will stumble blearily […]

  11. […] milder mornings had also brought another old friend, the wakey wakey bird, to be cheery outside my window at oh God do you really have to o’clock but – although […]

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