There’s a Hole in the Fence where the Sheep Get In

fence hole

… I’m stopping them from wandering (with apologies to the Beatles).

bedstead blocking hole

Given that I have also finished adding random shed parts (and also the former contents of the shed, including the old chipboard floor, which in some places was just mulch) to the carpeted area of the garden (complete with the salvaged landscaping fabric), there’s a danger that I have overdone the allotment chic…

veg plot in January

Indeed, adding a bedstead* to the fence may well have tipped me over into agricultural chic – my aunt and uncle memorably had a fine brass bedstead which I believe they had salvaged from a farmer’s ad hoc fencing arrangement.

In my head, this is all the chrysalis stage and eventually a beautiful butterfly of a garden will emerge, with some cleverly reclaimed material here and there to give it that make do and mend feel. Failing that, we’d better hope that old bedsteads, carpets and wandering sheep feature heavily at Chelsea this year…

* Mine has not yet stood the test of sheep, and may well need to be reinforced with baler twine, in which case I think we can say the transformation will be complete

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7 Responses to There’s a Hole in the Fence where the Sheep Get In

  1. Charles says:

    You ain’t got nothing less you got bailer twine. I inherited from a friend of my mother a fantastic Hardy folding salmon net, of which bailer twine played a crucial part. I took it into an authentic huntin, shootin and fishing shop in Blairgowrie to get a new net and it was received with all due respect. I also harvest bailer twine from the lanes to hold up tomato and bean poles.

  2. disgruntled says:

    I usually pick up the odd piece here and there as I see them when I’m out on the bike

  3. john gibson says:

    This looks like an impressive bit of work.

    Mine has not yet stood the test of sheep, and may well need to be reinforced with baler twine, in which case I think we can say the transformation will be complete.

    These things either work from the off, or you have to keep adding to it, and they always seem to find a way through.
    John

  4. WOL says:

    Apparently, the sheep in question are Houdini sheep. The breed is quite common I hear.

  5. welshcyclist says:

    I do believe the Tate Modern should be informed, the fence especially, is a fine piece of working art, cheers

  6. disgruntled says:

    @John – so far so good, although I’ve no idea if the sheep have been testing it properly yet
    @WOL – hmm, did Houdini do the trick where he wriggled in through an incredibly small hole and then totally failed to get out of a wide open gate though?
    @Welshcyclist – I don’t think it’s quite there yet – needs more twine …

  7. […] this is not the field with the hole in the fence, which I imagine would not prove lamb-proof even with my improvised defences. Even so, I imagine my […]

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