What Lies Beneath

So today (once our current hare had deigned to stop sunning itself in the back garden, preventing me from going outside & enjoying the sunshine myself) I thought I’d have a look and see how this year’s potato crop was shaping up

Pretty well, actually

digging up potatoes

Yup, very nicely indeed.

potato harvest

This is the initial* haul from the second of my three potato beds – the first had the first earlies in it (plus a fine crop of mushrooms) and we’re still only half way through those. I may need to upgrade my pototo storage solution so we can keep them through the winter and still have something to eat come Brexit.**

Meanwhile, in tenuously related news, the final chapter seems to have almost closed on our local stretch of the gas pipeline project with the mysterious pipe-and-bag arrangement now replaced with a much more engineering-y manhole cover, and the land returned to the cows.

manhole cover

Given the rate that grass grows around here, it’s already hard to imagine that there’s anything beneath this field but stones and soil, were it not for this warning sign (and incidental Gaelic lesson) and final loose ends which I have no doubt will be dealt with in the fullness of time.

pipeline warning sign

We’ll update you on this story as soon as we have news. I know, you can barely wait.

* Fellow gardeners will know that harvesting potatoes is a Zeno’s Arrow sort of an affair, with each dig yielding a few more, but still leaving enough in the ground to be a complete nuisance for years to come.

** Kidding ***

*** I hope.

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2 Responses to What Lies Beneath

  1. Charles says:

    I grew mine in spud bags and have eaten them already, Charlotte, very nice indeed. In fact so nice I bought 10 more Charlottes that have been in cold storage and will thus grow in the autumn. 3 are in a spud bag and 7 are in a cleared bed. If we avoid too many hard frosts in November I might have fresh spuds in December. Last time I tried this we had a week of sub zero temperature in November that killed them dead, even in the greenhouse. Us gardeners walk an environmental tightrope…

    No hares here but we did have a Partridge nest, unfortunately somebody ate the Partridge so we had no chicks to coo over.

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